Academia


October 21, 2020 Earl Lewis Spotlight

Ending the Third Slavery

In 2016, Dr. Earl Lewis convened a meeting on slavery among 40 principle collaborators—scholars, organizations, and instiutions—at The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Out of this meeting came the "Slavery and Its Aftermath" initiative at the Center for Social Solutions. This project aims to tackle America’s original sin—slavery.

October 30, 2019 Celia Williamson Opinion

400 Years of Slavery and the Lash of the Whip Can Still be Felt

Fighting modern-day enslavement is a full time job. Learn more from Dr. Celia Williamson, the host of "Emancipation Nation."

October 01, 2015 Cazzie Reyes Opinion

Historians Against Slavery Conference Recap

Today, the average African American will spend 30% of his or her working life either in prison or marked as an ex-felon. Moreover, prison labor in the U.S. is largely left out of state-imposed forced labor discussions.

April 20, 2015 Historians Against Slavery Opinion

Connecting Slavery Then with Slavery Now: Part 1

Americans find it difficult to empathize with today's enslaved, believing instead that all slaves were black, that their owners were all white, and that the Thirteenth Amendment eliminated human bondage.

March 12, 2015 Yale Gilder Lehrman Center Opinion

Sex Trafficking and the Carceral State

Recognizing that many sex workers have been exploited by third-party profiteers and may be victims of trafficking, the courts are intended to intervene in the further victimization of sex workers by the criminal justice system.

September 25, 2014 Yale Gilder Lehrman Center Opinion

Remembering and Interpreting Northern Slavery

Now institutions are integrating similar tales more often. One of the most interesting and important developments in the public presentation of slavery in the North has been the uptick in historic houses and museums reinterpreting their stories.

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A CONVERSATION : EVERFREE & STREET BUSINESS SCHOOL

In the Philippines in particular, the vast majority of the survivors we work with were trafficked while in the process of looking for employment. They were desperate, took chances that were risky, and it didn't work out for them, but it was that economic vulnerability that drove them to make those risky decisions.